Sears says some Kmart customer credit card numbers compromised

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Sears Holdings said on Wednesday it found a security breach involving “unauthorized” credit card activity following some customer purchases at its Kmart stores.

Certain credit card numbers were “compromised” in the event, the company said in an emailed statement, without providing exact figures.

No personal information such as contact details and social security numbers of customers were obtained by those responsible for the breach, Sears said.

“There is also no evidence that kmart.com or Sears customers were impacted,” it said.

Are Reimbursement Scams the New Thing?

Everyone knows scams have always been an issue, especially since the internet has grown, but now it appears a larger scam has developed.

It starts off with a phone call. An unknown individual will claim to be with a software, computer company, advising that their company is closing down and that software was purchased by you years ago. They’ll inform you that you’ll be receiving a reimbursement of $100 or more, because you didn’t get the total amount of years covered by the warranty. Free money sounds great, but are you really going to get this money? No. In fact, you’ll be paying them. How so?

Once the scammer advises you on the amount you’ll supposedly receive, they’ll ask you for financial information to send you the money. After they claim to have sent the money, they’ll say they accidently sent you too much, or they accidently added an extra zero, making it $1000 instead of $100, and you’ll need to send the difference back. Most of these scammers will ask that you send via wire transfer or by a gift card.

Unfortunately, many are falling victim to this newer scam. If you ever receive a phone call or email, stating you’ll be receiving a refund, be sure to listen to all the details and ensure a reputable company is calling you. Most of the time, companies will not attempt to refund you, even if they’re going out of business.

Government grant scams on the rise


The rise of government grant scams have increased within the last couple of years. Individuals receive phone and email communication, stating individuals are eligible to receive grant funding for particular tasks or awards.

How exactly does one identify a scam of this sort? First, the government will always contact you by US Mail, with detailed paperwork of such grants being offered. The government typically will not offer grants unless you inquire about them.

Secondly, the government will never ask you to send money in order to receive grant money. Many victims of these scams report that the suspects involved will request a certain amount of money, in order to receive the grant funding.

If you receive any calls regarding these scams and offers, contact the Federal Trade Commission at 1-877-FTC-HELP and block the caller. Never send any money to any individual offering grants or claiming to be part of the government.