Periscope app being used for child grooming


CHILDREN as young as NINE are being groomed by paedophiles on the live-streaming app Periscope, it has emerged.

Perverts are using it to watch youngsters’ broadcasts and bombard them with requests to remove their clothes or make explicit videos.

The grooming was revealed by the BBC, which then handed the evidence to police.

Periscope, which has more than 10 million users, allows people to film themselves on their smartphones and broadcast this live to anyone in the world.

In recent years it has been criticised for its users’ ability to globally broadcast live sport which would normally require viewers to pay subscription fees.

The BBC investigation found people sending messages to children as young as nine that included requests for them to “show skirt under desk” or “take off your top”.

Others sent pervy messages such as “ever had sex?”, “what’s your cup size sexy?” and “can I send you money for a show?”

Claire Lilley, head of online child safety at the NSPCC, called the investigation’s findings “disturbing”.

To see someone “so clearly groomed for sexual purposes by a pack of people online” was “shocking”, she added.

A spokesperson for Pericope’s owner, Twitter, stated: “We have a strong content moderation policy and encourage viewers to report comments they feel are abusive.

“We have zero tolerance for any form of child sexual exploitation.”

Earlier this year a teenage girl was jailed for live-streaming a video of her friend being raped via the Periscope app.

Marina Lonina, 19, was sentenced in Columbus, Ohio, on Monday after pleading guilty to obstructing justice under a deal with prosecutors.

Story by The Sun

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CCRA begins next step in the right direction

Last nights Board of Directors meeting went extremely well; appropriately structuring the Board, electing new positions and revising certain bylaws. At the time our President and Executive Director Matthew Baumgartner had a difficult decision to make between staying on the Board voluntarily or taking the Executive Director/CEO position full time paid. 

Before President Baumgartner’s resignation of his Board seat, he decided to nominate Vice President Stephen Bernardoni for the Presidential Chair. Mr. Bernardoni accepted the nomination running unopposed and was officially voted in by the board unanimously.

Legacy President Mr. Baumgartner made a speech during his resignation and had this to say;

“It has been my honor to serve this Agency as its President/Founder and Executive Director for seven great years! As we continue to grow there will be decisions that will need to be made and this is one of them. 

I feel it would be in the best interest of the Agency if I’m able to dedicate full-time to our operations as the CEO. In order for CCRA to exceed on the cusp of our success, it is imperative that my voice is still heard as a non-voting member of the board and to maintain a healthy partnership between the Office of the Director and Office of the President. 

My decision is not that I’d be stepping down, but of that to excel forward as I continue to mentor, guide and teach those coming into the Agency both on the board and in operations. Again, thank you for this opportunity and working so hard as a dedicated team. Together, we’ll stand against cyber crime world-wide!”

CCRA partners with Stand for the Silent


CCRA and Stand for the Silent held a partnership meeting last Thursday, to discuss how the two organizations could assist each other for October’s Cyber Bullying Awareness Month. Both organizations agreed that this partnership was an exciting movement for each other.

CCRA administration stated that the main reason for their respect in this partnership was due to additional resources now available. “We now have a place to refer victims to, where they can talk about their issues, such as bullying and depression” said Stephen Bernardoni, Vice Executive. “Mr. Smalley was also happy that his organization now has resources for those who need assistance with finding hidden suspects involved in their situation.”

As the partnership progresses, both organizations will promote one another in October and attempt to spread awareness about one another’s services and abilities.

Are Reimbursement Scams the New Thing?

Everyone knows scams have always been an issue, especially since the internet has grown, but now it appears a larger scam has developed.

It starts off with a phone call. An unknown individual will claim to be with a software, computer company, advising that their company is closing down and that software was purchased by you years ago. They’ll inform you that you’ll be receiving a reimbursement of $100 or more, because you didn’t get the total amount of years covered by the warranty. Free money sounds great, but are you really going to get this money? No. In fact, you’ll be paying them. How so?

Once the scammer advises you on the amount you’ll supposedly receive, they’ll ask you for financial information to send you the money. After they claim to have sent the money, they’ll say they accidently sent you too much, or they accidently added an extra zero, making it $1000 instead of $100, and you’ll need to send the difference back. Most of these scammers will ask that you send via wire transfer or by a gift card.

Unfortunately, many are falling victim to this newer scam. If you ever receive a phone call or email, stating you’ll be receiving a refund, be sure to listen to all the details and ensure a reputable company is calling you. Most of the time, companies will not attempt to refund you, even if they’re going out of business.

Government grant scams on the rise


The rise of government grant scams have increased within the last couple of years. Individuals receive phone and email communication, stating individuals are eligible to receive grant funding for particular tasks or awards.

How exactly does one identify a scam of this sort? First, the government will always contact you by US Mail, with detailed paperwork of such grants being offered. The government typically will not offer grants unless you inquire about them.

Secondly, the government will never ask you to send money in order to receive grant money. Many victims of these scams report that the suspects involved will request a certain amount of money, in order to receive the grant funding.

If you receive any calls regarding these scams and offers, contact the Federal Trade Commission at 1-877-FTC-HELP and block the caller. Never send any money to any individual offering grants or claiming to be part of the government.

How to safely shop on eBay!

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With today’s internet technology, you can pretty much buy anything with the click of a mouse.. literally. Companies like eBay and amazon give sellers the ability to profit off their goods, while at the same time helping others seek whey desire. Unfortunately eBay buyers and others do not fall short of becoming the victim of countless scams and fraudulent products.

We’ve come up with a list of procedures you should check before purchasing from sellers online. We hope these will be sufficient enough to make your chances of a scam, less.

CHECK THE SELLER’S COMMENTS AND POSITIVE FEEDBACK

When you’re interested in purchasing an item, make sure you check the feedback before pressing submit & pay. A lot of sellers have a positive or negative feedback on their profile. If you need more negative than positive, it might not be a good idea to proceed.

USE CAUTION WHEN PURCHASING FROM A NEW SELLER ACCOUNT

Many scammers will create brand new seller accounts, in an effort to avoid being detected. If the account is new, there is no feedback, use caution. You might want to see if there’s a better deal from another seller.

AVOID SELLERS WHO WANT TO RECEIVE PAYMENTS IN OTHER WAYS

eBay and others have strict policies on how payments can be sent to the seller. eBay mostly prefers you use their website or PayPal to send transactions. Avoid sellers who want you to take payments off eBay’s website and request money orders or gift cards.

READ THE ITEM’S DESCRIPTION BEFORE PROCEEDING WITH PURCHASE

As much as we hate to say it, many buyers have failed to read the description of items before purchasing. Scammers will add in small bits of text, saying something to the effect of “This is a PlayStation One picture”, while the buyer misses that part, believing it is an actual PlayStation One console.

ONLY PURCHASE FROM REPUTABLE WEBSITES

Avoid buying from websites that are completely unknown to you. If you search for an item and stumble across http://www.johndoesstuff.com, you might want to avoid it, especially if it cannot be proven to be reputable.

With these mentioned, we hope it’ll better protect you and your friends, in avoiding online scams!

 

Sextortion and how to prevent it

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Cyber Crime Response Agency receives many calls per week from individuals reporting that an online sexual encounter took place, with the opposite sex on camera. These situations typically result in the other party threatening to post private images of the victim online, unless that victim pays an amount of money.

A lot of the reportees we receive are worried that they’ve committed a type of crime. This could be further from the truth. As long as both parties involved understand that both are legal adults, anyone can have any type of encounter with another.

So how exactly do these suspects find their victims? Many of them search Facebook for random Facebook accounts, while others post in personals online. On Facebook, it typically starts off with a random friend request from the opposite sex. Once the account owner accepts the friend request, the suspect will then attempt to entice and encourage the account owner to come on camera, to engage in sexual activities. The threat can occur at any time, from the middle to the end of the encounter. Threats typically consist of statements that videos or pictures have been saved and will be posted or sent to family, if an amount of money isn’t sent.

Humiliating, right? So how can you avoid these types of situations? Simple! Don’t have them. Although crimes aren’t being committed by having the encounter, you have to take into consideration, the possibilities of threats. Should you fall for these types of crimes, do not make payment to anyone, for any reason, no matter how severe the threat is. In our experience, 95% of suspects to threaten, do not actually follow through with their threats. Why? Because they have nothing to gain from it.

You can make reports of these situations to the Federal Trade Commission at 1-877-FTC-HELP.