Critical Patches Issued for Microsoft Products, 07-11-2017

MS-ISAC ADVISORY NUMBER:
2017-063

DATE ISSUED:
07/11/2017

SUBJECT:
Critical Patches Issued for Microsoft Products, July 11, 2017

OVERVIEW:
Multiple vulnerabilities have been discovered in Microsoft products, the most severe of which could allow for remote code execution. Successful exploitation of the most severe of these vulnerabilities could result in an attacker gaining the same privileges as the logged on user. Depending on the privileges associated with the user, an attacker could then install programs; view, change, or delete data; or create new accounts with full user rights. Users whose accounts are configured to have fewer user rights on the system could be less impacted than those who operate with administrative user rights.

THREAT INTELLIGENCE:
There are currently no reports of these vulnerabilities being exploited in the wild.

SYSTEMS AFFECTED:
• Microsoft Internet Explorer 9, 10, 11
• Microsoft Edge
• Microsoft .NET Framework
• Microsoft Windows: 7, 8.1, RT 8.1, 10
• Microsoft Windows Server: 2008, 2008 R2, 2012, 2012 R2, 2016
• Microsoft Windows Server Core Installations: 2008, 2008 R2, 2012, 2012 R2, 2016
• Microsoft Office Web Apps 2010
• Microsoft Office 2007, 2010, 2011, 2013, 2016
• Microsoft SharePoint Enterprise Server 2013, 2016

RISK:
Government:
• Large and medium government entities: High
• Small government entities: Medium
Businesses:
• Large and medium business entities: High
• Small business entities: Medium
Home users: Low

TECHNICAL SUMMARY:
Microsoft products are prone to multiple vulnerabilities, the most severe of which could allow for remote code execution.

A full list of all vulnerabilities can be found at the link below.
https://portal.msrc.microsoft.com/en-us/security-guidance

Successful exploitation of the most severe of these vulnerabilities could result in an attacker gaining the same privileges as the logged on user. Depending on the privileges associated with the user, an attacker could then install programs; view, change, or delete data; or create new accounts with full user rights. Users whose accounts are configured to have fewer user rights on the system could be less impacted than those who operate with administrative user rights.

RECOMMENDATIONS:
We recommend the following actions be taken:
• Apply appropriate patches or appropriate mitigations provided by Microsoft to vulnerable systems immediately after appropriate testing.
• Run all software as a non-privileged user (one without administrative privileges) to diminish the effects of a successful attack.
• Remind users not to visit un-trusted websites or follow links provided by unknown or un-trusted sources.
• Inform and educate users regarding threats posed by hypertext links contained in emails or attachments especially from un-trusted sources.
• Apply the Principle of Least Privilege to all systems and services.

REFERENCES:
Microsoft:
https://portal.msrc.microsoft.com/en-us/security-guidance
https://portal.msrc.microsoft.com/en-us/security-guidance/releasenotedetail/f2b16606-4945-e711-80dc-000d3a32fc99

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Beware of Tech Support Scams

scam

You might be aware of technical support scams already having taken place around the nation. Our nation is not the only one vulnerable to these types of crimes. Unfortunately, these matters don’t seem to be going away any time soon.

It’s over before you know it. You receive a call from an unknown telephone number, stating the caller is from Microsoft or Apple or any other major technology company, stating your computer is infected and access is needed by the individual to fix your computer. This type of scam occurs more often than we’d like; in fact, almost daily.

So how do you know the technical support caller is authentic? Simple answer: they aren’t. How so? We’ve spoken with the major companies such as Microsoft and Apple, who both told us they’d never contact anyone unsolicited, alerting of intrusions to computers. Why is that? Because the technology to monitor every single computer by these companies is not real. Not only that, but these companies have so many assignments, they wouldn’t have time to go “snooping” through every single computer without the owner’s consent. Not only that, but it would be highly illegal and an invasion of privacy.

What is the best way to deal with these types of calls? Do not budge and do not allow entry to your computer. Simply reporting the telephone number, caller’s name (if given) and the caller’s intentions to the Federal Trade Commission is the best solution as of now. Unfortunately, the Federal Trade Commission has stated that these technical support scam callers will continue to call once they’ve made contact with you. Simply block the number on your device and hope they aren’t smart enough to find another number of yours.

Federal Trade Commission: 1-877-FTC-HELP